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Volume 2014, Article ID 576249, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/576249
Research Article

Children Living near a Sanitary Landfill Have Increased Breath Methane and Methanobrevibacter smithii in Their Intestinal Microbiota

1Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 598 Botucatu Street, Vila Clementino, 04023-062 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Centro Universitário FIEO, 300 Franz Voegeli Avenida, Vila Yara, 06020-190 Osasco, SP, Brazil
3Division of Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 188 Leandro Dupret Street, Vila Clementino, 04025-010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 30 June 2014; Revised 23 September 2014; Accepted 28 September 2014; Published 13 October 2014

Academic Editor: William B. Whitman

Copyright © 2014 Humberto Bezerra de Araujo Filho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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