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Archaea
Volume 2015, Article ID 241608, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/241608
Research Article

Adaptation, Ecology, and Evolution of the Halophilic Stromatolite Archaeon Halococcus hamelinensis Inferred through Genome Analyses

1School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
2Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 29 October 2014; Revised 4 December 2014; Accepted 10 December 2014

Academic Editor: William B. Whitman

Copyright © 2015 Reema K. Gudhka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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