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Archaea
Volume 2016, Article ID 1259608, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1259608
Review Article

Archaea in Natural and Impacted Brazilian Environments

Department of Cell Biology, Biological Sciences Institute, University of Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil

Received 2 June 2016; Accepted 8 September 2016

Academic Editor: Franck Carbonero

Copyright © 2016 Thiago Rodrigues et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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