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Volume 2016, Article ID 1851865, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1851865
Review Article

Arguments Reinforcing the Three-Domain View of Diversified Cellular Life

1Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan
2Biological Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup, Republic of Korea
3Division of Polar Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, Republic of Korea
4Institut Pasteur, Unité de Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles (BMGE), Département de Microbiologie, 75015 Paris, France
5Evolutionary Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA

Received 16 August 2016; Revised 18 October 2016; Accepted 3 November 2016

Academic Editor: Stefan Spring

Copyright © 2016 Arshan Nasir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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