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Archaea
Volume 2016, Article ID 4089684, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4089684
Research Article

Archaea and Bacteria Acclimate to High Total Ammonia in a Methanogenic Reactor Treating Swine Waste

1Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 875701, Tempe, AZ 85287-5701, USA
2School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA
3Department of Civil Engineering, Kansas State University, 2118 Fiedler Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA

Received 10 June 2016; Accepted 11 August 2016

Academic Editor: Jessica A. Smith

Copyright © 2016 Sofia Esquivel-Elizondo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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