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Archaea
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4706532, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4706532
Research Article

Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

1Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2Electron Imaging Center for Nanomachines, California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3The UCLA Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 09905, USA
4Institute of Industrial Biotechnology, GC University, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
5The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 11 December 2015; Accepted 20 March 2016

Academic Editor: Harald Engelhardt

Copyright © 2016 Daniel B. Toso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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