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Archaea
Volume 2017, Article ID 9763848, 18 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9763848
Review Article

Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling of Archaea Lends Insight into Diversity of Metabolic Function

1Center for Biophysics and Quantitative Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
3Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, 1206 W Gregory Dr., Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Zaida Luthey-Schulten; ude.sionilli@naz

Received 22 July 2016; Revised 17 October 2016; Accepted 1 November 2016; Published 4 January 2017

Academic Editor: Hans-Peter Klenk

Copyright © 2017 ShengShee Thor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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