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Volume 2018, Article ID 3194108, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3194108
Review Article

Diversity and Niche of Archaea in Bioremediation

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Mark James Krzmarzick; ude.etatsko@kcizramzrk.kram

Received 5 May 2018; Accepted 1 August 2018; Published 3 September 2018

Academic Editor: Yu Tao

Copyright © 2018 Mark James Krzmarzick et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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