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Anatomy Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 236894, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/236894
Research Article

Mosaic Evolution of Brainstem Motor Nuclei in Catarrhine Primates

1Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
2Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA

Received 11 February 2011; Accepted 11 April 2011

Academic Editor: Anne M. Burrows

Copyright © 2011 Seth D. Dobson and Chet C. Sherwood. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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