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Anatomy Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 378431, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/378431
Research Article

Anatomical Correlates to Nectar Feeding among the Strepsirrhines of Madagascar: Implications for Interpreting the Fossil Record

1Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, MN210 Chandler Medical Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
2Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA

Received 16 December 2010; Revised 7 April 2011; Accepted 7 July 2011

Academic Editor: Anne M. Burrows

Copyright © 2011 Magdalena N. Muchlinski and Jonathan M. G. Perry. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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