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Anatomy Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 831943, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/831943
Research Article

Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli

1Department of Biology, Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601, USA
2Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, 555 31st Street, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA

Received 15 December 2010; Revised 27 February 2011; Accepted 2 March 2011

Academic Editor: Kathleen M. Muldoon

Copyright © 2011 Adam Hartstone-Rose and Jonathan M. G. Perry. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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