Table of Contents
Anatomy Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 948671, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/948671
Research Article

A Comparative Study of Growth Patterns in Crested Langurs and Vervet Monkeys

Department of Anthropology, Modesto College, 435 College Avenue, Modesto, CA 95350, USA

Received 14 October 2010; Accepted 21 December 2010

Academic Editor: Kathleen M. Muldoon

Copyright © 2011 Debra R. Bolter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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