Table of Contents
Anatomy Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 151342, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/151342
Research Article

The “Oblique Popliteal Ligament”: A Macro- and Microanalysis to Determine If It Is a Ligament or a Tendon

1Department of Medical Anatomical Sciences, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP-Northwest, 200 Mullins Way, Lebanon, OR 97355, USA
2Department of Family Practice, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP-Northwest, 200 Mullins Way, Lebanon, OR 97355, USA
3Samaritan Health Services Orthopaedics, Residency Faculty, Corvallis, OR 97330, USA
4Samaritan Health Services General Surgery, Residency Faculty, Corvallis, OR 97330, USA
5Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, 611 SW Campus Drive, Portland, OR 97239, USA
6Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, 611 SW Campus Drive, Portland, OR 97239, USA
7Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, Oregon Health & Science University, 611 SW Campus Drive, Portland, OR 97239, USA

Received 18 January 2012; Revised 7 March 2012; Accepted 7 March 2012

Academic Editor: Konstantinos Natsis

Copyright © 2012 Brion Benninger and Taylor Delamarter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. This study investigated the importance of the “oblique popliteal ligament” (OPL), and challenges its alleged ligament status. The currently named OPL is indigenous to the distal semimembranosus (SMT); therefore, by definition is not a ligament inserting from bone to bone. Clinically, a muscle-tendon unit is different then a ligament regarding proprioception and surgery. Methods. Literature search was conducted on texts, journals and websites regarding the formation of the OPL. Dissection of 70 knees included macro analysis, harvesting OPL, distal SMT and LCL samples and performing immunohistochemistry to 16 knees with antibody staining to the OPL, distal SMT and LCL. Results. All but one text claimed the OPL receives fibers from SMT. Macro dissection of 70 knees revealed the OPL forming from the distal SMT (100%). Microanalysis of OPL, distal SMT and LCL samples from 16 knees demonstrated expression of nervous tissue within selected samples. Discussion. No journals or texts have hypothesized that the OPL is a tendon. Clinically it is important we know the type of tissue for purposes of maximizing rehabilitation and surgical techniques. Conclusion. This study suggests the OPL be considered the oblique popliteal tendon as a result of the macro and micro evidence revealed.