Table of Contents
Anatomy Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 370852, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/370852
Research Article

Midsagittal Anatomy of Lumbar Lordosis in Adult Egyptians: MRI Study

1Anatomy Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt
2Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt

Received 9 July 2014; Accepted 24 July 2014; Published 18 August 2014

Academic Editor: Robert J. Spinner

Copyright © 2014 Abdelmonem A. Hegazy and Raafat A. Hegazy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Despite the increasing recognition of the functional and clinical importance of lumbar lordosis, little is known about its description, particularly in Egypt. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced as a noninvasive diagnostic technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis using midsagittal MRIs. Normal lumbar spine MRIs obtained from 93 individuals (46 males, 47 females; 25–57 years old) were evaluated retrospectively. The lumbar spine curvature and its segments “vertebrae and discs” were described and measured. The lumbar lordosis angle (LLA) was larger in females than in males. Its mean values increased by age. The lumbar height (LH) was longer in males than in females. At the same time, the lumbar breadth (LB) was higher in females than in males. Lumbar index (LI = LB/LH × 100) showed significant gender differences (). Lordosis was formed by wedging of intervertebral discs and bodies of lower lumbar vertebrae. In conclusion, MRI might clearly reveal the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis. Use of LI in association with LLA could be useful in evaluation of lumbar lordosis.