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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 129795, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/129795
Review Article

Dysautonomia in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Case Reports of a Family with Review of the Literature

1Preventive Medicine Group/Private Practice, 24700 Center Ridge Road, Westlake, OH 44145, USA
2Department of Pathology, School of Medicine Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
3King James Medical Laboratory, Westlake, OH 44145, USA

Received 7 October 2010; Accepted 10 April 2011

Academic Editor: Mohammad-Reza Mohammadi

Copyright © 2011 Derrick Lonsdale et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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