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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 545901, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/545901
Review Article

The Broader Autism Phenotype and Its Implications on the Etiology and Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

1Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Received 11 August 2010; Revised 13 March 2011; Accepted 9 May 2011

Academic Editor: Connie Kasari

Copyright © 2011 Jennifer Gerdts and Raphael Bernier. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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