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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 657383, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/657383
Research Article

Eye Movement Sequences during Simple versus Complex Information Processing of Scenes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

1School of Psychology Shackleton Building, University of Southampton, Highfield SO17 1BJ, UK
2Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6
3Psychology Department, University of California, San Diego, Mandler Hall, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA

Received 31 October 2010; Revised 20 May 2011; Accepted 20 June 2011

Academic Editor: Elizabeth Aylward

Copyright © 2011 Sheena K. Au-Yeung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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