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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 986519, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/986519
Research Article

Intracellular and Extracellular Redox Status and Free Radical Generation in Primary Immune Cells from Children with Autism

Department of Pediatrics, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA

Received 30 July 2011; Revised 12 August 2011; Accepted 12 September 2011

Academic Editor: Antonio M. Persico

Copyright © 2012 Shannon Rose et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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