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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2013, Article ID 480635, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/480635
Research Article

The Relationship between Comprehension of Figurative Language by Japanese Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders and College Freshmen’s Assessment of Its Conventionality of Usage

1Research Center for Child Mental Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Kanazawa University, B-b43, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa 920-8640, Japan
2Nihon Fukushi University Chuo College of Social Services, 3-27-11 Chiyoda, Naka-ku, Nagoya 460-0012, Japan

Received 24 June 2013; Revised 6 September 2013; Accepted 6 September 2013

Academic Editor: Manuel F. Casanova

Copyright © 2013 Manabu Oi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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