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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 327271, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/327271
Research Article

Defining Autism: Variability in State Education Agency Definitions of and Evaluations for Autism Spectrum Disorders

1Special Education, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Counselor Education, NC State University, Poe Hall 602, Campus Box 7801, Raleigh, NC 27695-7801, USA
2North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607, USA

Received 24 December 2013; Revised 28 March 2014; Accepted 23 May 2014; Published 2 June 2014

Academic Editor: Geraldine Dawson

Copyright © 2014 Malinda L. Pennington et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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