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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 345878, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/345878
Research Article

No Differences in Emotion Recognition Strategies in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence from Hybrid Faces

1Laboratory of Experimental Psychology, KU Leuven, Tiensestraat 102 (Box 3711), 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2Department of Child Psychiatry, UPC-KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
3Leuven Autism Research (LAuRes), KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
4Quantitative Psychology and Individual Differences, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
5Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital Maastricht, 6200 Maastricht, The Netherlands
6Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
7Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA, Boston, USA

Received 28 June 2013; Revised 24 November 2013; Accepted 2 December 2013; Published 5 January 2014

Academic Editor: Connie Kasari

Copyright © 2014 Kris Evers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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