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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 678346, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/678346
Research Article

Temporal Synchrony Detection and Associations with Language in Young Children with ASD

1Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 434 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
2Division of Speech & Hearing Sciences, CB No. 7190, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Division of Occupational Sciences, CB No. 7122, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

Received 27 August 2014; Revised 3 December 2014; Accepted 9 December 2014; Published 29 December 2014

Academic Editor: Mikhail V. Pletnikov

Copyright © 2014 Elena Patten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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