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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 369035, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/369035
Review Article

Neural Mechanisms Involved in Hypersensitive Hearing: Helping Children with ASD Who Are Overly Sensitive to Sounds

1Howard University, Washington, DC, USA
2Advanced Brain Technologies, Ogden, UT, USA

Received 6 September 2015; Revised 14 November 2015; Accepted 1 December 2015

Academic Editor: Roberto Canitano

Copyright © 2015 Jay R. Lucker and Alex Doman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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