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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 617190, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/617190
Research Article

Gaze Behavior of Children with ASD toward Pictures of Facial Expressions

1Department of Psychology, Keio University, 2-15-45 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073, Japan
2Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083, Japan
3CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan

Received 10 March 2015; Revised 29 April 2015; Accepted 10 May 2015

Academic Editor: Geraldine Dawson

Copyright © 2015 Soichiro Matsuda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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