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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 736516, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/736516
Research Article

The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

1Department of Physical Therapy, Biomechanics and Movement Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA
2Physical Therapy Program, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
3Center for Health, Intervention, and Prevention, Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
4Behavioral Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA

Received 17 July 2015; Revised 6 November 2015; Accepted 26 November 2015

Academic Editor: Klaus-Peter Ossenkopp

Copyright © 2015 Sudha M. Srinivasan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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