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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2016, Article ID 5073078, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5073078
Clinical Study

Illness Severity, Social and Cognitive Ability, and EEG Analysis of Ten Patients with Rett Syndrome Treated with Mecasermin (Recombinant Human IGF-1)

1Tuscany Rett Center, Ospedale Versilia, 55043 Lido di Camaiore, Italy
2School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland
3Department of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland
4Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland
5Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland
6Neuropsychiatric Genetics, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St. James Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland

Received 24 August 2015; Revised 25 December 2015; Accepted 29 December 2015

Academic Editor: Robert F. Berman

Copyright © 2016 Giorgio Pini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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