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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2017, Article ID 5843851, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5843851
Research Article

Social Skills Intervention Participation and Associated Improvements in Executive Function Performance

1Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA
2Thompson Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA
3Department of Special Education, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Shawn E. Christ; ude.iruossim@estsirhc

Received 17 April 2017; Revised 7 July 2017; Accepted 9 August 2017; Published 17 September 2017

Academic Editor: Herbert Roeyers

Copyright © 2017 Shawn E. Christ et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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