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Bone Marrow Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 128436, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/128436
Review Article

Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

1Department of Pathophysiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, 94 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300071, China
2The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, The College of Life Science, Nankai University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300071, China
3Department of Intensive Care Unit (ICU), People’s Hospital of Rizhao, Shandong 276826, China

Received 8 December 2013; Revised 13 February 2014; Accepted 15 February 2014; Published 14 April 2014

Academic Editor: Helen A. Papadaki

Copyright © 2014 Ningning He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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