Table of Contents
Biotechnology Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 162987, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/162987
Research Article

Effect of Alcohol Structure on the Optimum Condition for Novozym 435-Catalyzed Synthesis of Adipate Esters

1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
2Structural Biology Research Center, Malaysia Genome Institute, MTDC-UKM, Smart Technology Centre, UKM Bangi, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 9 June 2011; Accepted 20 September 2011

Academic Editor: Shengwu Ma

Copyright © 2011 Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul Rahman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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