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Biotechnology Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 274693, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/274693
Review Article

Biosynthesis and Virulent Behavior of Lipids Produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: LAM and Cord Factor: An Overview

Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (CSIR), Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007, India

Received 18 August 2010; Revised 21 October 2010; Accepted 29 November 2010

Academic Editor: Gabriel A. Monteiro

Copyright © 2011 Rajni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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