Table of Contents
Biotechnology Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 450802, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/450802
Review Article

Biotechnological Tools for Environmental Sustainability: Prospects and Challenges for Environments in Nigeria—A Standard Review

1Industrial Biochemistry and Environmental Biotechnology Unit, Chemical Sciences Department, Godfrey Okoye University, P.M.B. 01014, Enugu, Nigeria
2Pure and Industrial Chemistry Unit, Chemical Sciences Department, Godfrey Okoye University, P.M.B. 01014, Enugu, Nigeria
3Pollution Control and Biotechnology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria

Received 13 June 2011; Revised 13 December 2011; Accepted 13 December 2011

Academic Editor: Manuel Canovas

Copyright © 2012 Chukwuma S. Ezeonu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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