Table of Contents
Chemotherapy Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 268681, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/268681
Review Article

Extracellular Matrix Proteins Modulate Antimigratory and Apoptotic Effects of Doxorubicin

1UFR Pharmacie, FRE CNRS/URCA no. 3481, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51096 Reims, Cedex, France
2UFR Medecine, FRE CNRS/URCA no. 3481, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51096 Reims, Cedex, France
3UFR Sciences, FRE CNRS/URCA no. 3481, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51687 Reims, Cedex 2, France

Received 3 February 2012; Accepted 30 April 2012

Academic Editor: Vassilios A. Georgoulias

Copyright © 2012 Georges Said et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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