Table of Contents
Conference Papers in Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 528909, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/528909
Conference Paper

Hypoxia Immunity, Metabolism, and Hyperthermia

1Centro Medico Demetra, Center for Clinical Hyperthermia and Immunity, Via Staderini, 19/B, 05100 Terni, Italy
2Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow 115478, Russia
3Laboratoire d’Informatique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France
4Department of Animal Biology and CNR Institute of Molecular Genetics, Section of Histochemistry and Cytometry, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
5Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Ospedale San Salvatore, 6112 Pesaro, Italy
6Integrated Health Clinic, 23242 Mavis Avenue, Fort Langley, BC, Canada V1M 2R4

Received 14 January 2013; Accepted 3 April 2013

Academic Editors: M. Jackson, D. Lee, and A. Szasz

This Conference Paper is based on a presentation given by Gianfranco Baronzio at “Conference of the International Clinical Hyperthermia Society 2012” held from 12 October 2012 to 14 October 2012 in Budapest, Hungary.

Copyright © 2013 Gianfranco Baronzio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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