Table of Contents
Conference Papers in Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 369246, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/369246
Conference Paper

Modeling Cardiac Congenital Diseases: From Mathematic Tools to Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padua Medical School, Via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua, Italy

Received 22 November 2013; Accepted 9 March 2014; Published 12 May 2014

Academic Editors: V. La Carrubba, A. Lepedda, and J. C. Rodriguez-Cabello

This Conference Paper is based on a presentation given by Laura Iop at “LIAC Meeting on Vascular Research 2013” held from 18 September 2013 to 21 September 2013 in Alghero, Italy.

Copyright © 2014 Laura Iop. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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