Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 327360, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/327360
Review Article

The GRK2 Overexpression Is a Primary Hallmark of Mitochondrial Lesions during Early Alzheimer Disease

1Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Department of Biology, College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1664, USA
3Electron Microscopy Research Center, College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1664, USA
4Department of Cytology, Histology and Embryology, Azerbaijan Medical University, Baku AZ10-25, Azerbaijan
5Department of Psychiatry, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw 50-229, Poland
6School of Health Science and Healthcare Administration, University of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30360, USA

Received 17 September 2009; Accepted 16 November 2009

Academic Editor: Janusz K. Rybakowski

Copyright © 2009 Mark E. Obrenovich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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