Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 362795, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/362795
Review Article

Membrane Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency as a Preventable Risk Factor for Comorbid Coronary Heart Disease in Major Depressive Disorder

Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA

Received 11 May 2009; Accepted 10 July 2009

Academic Editor: Radmila M. Manev

Copyright © 2009 Robert K. McNamara. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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