Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009, Article ID 791017, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/791017
Hypothesis

Cardiovascular Disease and Psychiatric Comorbidity: The Potential Role of Perseverative Cognition

Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109, USA

Received 16 March 2009; Accepted 1 June 2009

Academic Editor: Hari Manev

Copyright © 2009 Britta A. Larsen and Nicholas J. S. Christenfeld. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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