Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 849519, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/849519
Hypothesis

Putative Role of MicroRNA-Regulated Pathways in Comorbid Neurological and Cardiovascular Disorders

1Centre de Recherche du CHUQ (CHUL), Axe Neurosciences, Canada
2Département de Biologie Médicale, Université Laval, Laval, QC, G1k 7P4, Canada

Received 27 May 2009; Revised 26 June 2009; Accepted 2 July 2009

Academic Editor: Hari Manev

Copyright © 2009 Sébastien S. Hébert. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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