Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2010, Article ID 153657, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/153657
Review Article

Effects of S100B on Serotonergic Plasticity and Neuroinflammation in the Hippocampus in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: Studies in an S100B Overexpressing Mouse Model

1Departments of Surgery, Neurosurgery, and Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Scott & White Hospital, Central Texas Veterans Health System, Temple, TX 76504, USA
2Program in Biopsychology, Department of Psychology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2500, USA
3Department of Psychology, Dowling College, Oakdale, NY 11769, USA

Received 10 March 2010; Revised 1 June 2010; Accepted 2 July 2010

Academic Editor: Rosario Donato

Copyright © 2010 Lee A. Shapiro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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