Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 396282, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/396282
Research Article

Serotonin Transporter Clustering in Blood Lymphocytes of Reeler Mice

BIOFARMA Research Group, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Galicia, Spain

Received 21 December 2009; Accepted 10 February 2010

Academic Editor: Milos Ikonomovic

Copyright © 2010 Tania Rivera-Baltanas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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