Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 780645, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/780645
Review Article

Mood Disorders Are Glial Disorders: Evidence from In Vivo Studies

1Department of Psychiatry, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, 10362 Berlin, Germany
2Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Molecular Pharmacology, 10125 Berlin, Germany
3Day Clinic of Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
4Department of Cognitive Neurology & Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Unit, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
5Clinic for Pediatric Cardiology, University Clinic of Saarland, 66421 Homburg/Saar, Germany
6Department of Psychiatry, University of Magdeburg, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany

Received 18 February 2010; Accepted 30 March 2010

Academic Editor: Claus W. Heizmann

Copyright © 2010 Matthias L. Schroeter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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