Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 801295, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/801295
Clinical Study

The Passage of S100B from Brain to Blood Is Not Specifically Related to the Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity

1Department of Neurosurgery, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
2Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany

Received 28 February 2010; Revised 12 May 2010; Accepted 24 May 2010

Academic Editor: Rosario Donato

Copyright © 2010 Andrea Kleindienst et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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