Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 324374, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/324374
Review Article

Emotional Regulation and Depression: A Potential Mediator between Heart and Mind

1Department of Human and Social Sciences, University of Bergamo, Piazza S. Agostino 2, 24124 Bergamo, Italy
2Human Factors and Technologies in Healthcare Centre, University of Bergamo, Italy
3Psychology Division, Nottingham Trent University, UK

Received 22 September 2013; Revised 17 April 2014; Accepted 23 April 2014; Published 22 June 2014

Academic Editor: Janusz K. Rybakowski

Copyright © 2014 Angelo Compare et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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