Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 370612, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/370612
Review Article

Risk Factors Associated with Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review

1Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester LE2 7LX, UK
2Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester LE3 9QP, UK
3University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK
4Department of Medical Physics, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK

Received 10 August 2015; Accepted 15 September 2015

Academic Editor: Koichi Hirata

Copyright © 2015 Nikil Patel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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