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Case Reports in Pathology
Volume 2013, Article ID 269543, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/269543
Case Report

Giant Accessory Right-Sided Suprarenal Spleen in Thalassaemia

Department of Surgery, University of the West Indies, General Hospital, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

Received 8 January 2013; Accepted 29 January 2013

Academic Editors: O. Fadare, M. Mazzocchi, and I. Meattini

Copyright © 2013 A. Arra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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