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Case Reports in Rheumatology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 509136, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/509136
Case Report

Radiological Followup of the Evolution of Inflammatory Process in Sacroiliac Joint with Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case with Pyogenic Sacroiliitis

1Division of Rheumatology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy School of Medicine, 06018 Etlik, Ankara, Turkey
2Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy School of Medicine, 06018 Etlik, Ankara, Turkey

Received 12 August 2012; Accepted 29 August 2012

Academic Editors: U. Gresser and F. Schiavon

Copyright © 2012 Muhammet Cinar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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