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Case Reports in Rheumatology
Volume 2012, Article ID 934324, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/934324
Case Report

Severe Eosinophilic Syndrome Associated with the Use of Probiotic Supplements: A New Entity?

1Jefferson Institute of Molecular Medicine and Scleroderma Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
2Rheumatology Division, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
3Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

Received 12 October 2012; Accepted 4 November 2012

Academic Editors: K. P. Makaritsis, S. C. Plastiras, and P. E. Prete

Copyright © 2012 Fabian A. Mendoza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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