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Case Reports in Rheumatology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8219317, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8219317
Case Report

Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

Department of Rheumatology, Nova Southeastern University/Larkin Hospital, Coral Springs, FL, USA

Received 18 September 2016; Revised 20 November 2016; Accepted 27 November 2016

Academic Editor: Mario Salazar-Paramo

Copyright © 2016 Naveen Raj and Barry Waters. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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