Table of Contents
Dataset Papers in Ecology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 468973, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.7167/2013/468973
Dataset Paper

Long-Term Data from Fields Recovering after Sugarcane, Banana, and Pasture Cultivation in Ecuador

Biology Department, Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma City, OK 73017, USA

Received 2 April 2012; Accepted 28 May 2012

Academic Editors: A. Arunachalam, A. Etter, and O. J. Sun

Copyright © 2013 Randall W. Myster. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. W. Myster and S. T. A. Pickett, “Initial conditions, history and successional pathways in ten contrasting old fields,” American Midland Naturalist, vol. 124, no. 2, pp. 231–238, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. R. W. Myster and S. T. A. Pickett, “A comparison of rate of succession over 18 yr in 10 contrasting old fields,” Ecology, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 387–392, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. F. E. Egler, “Vegetation science concepts I. Initial floristic composition, a factor in old-field vegetation development with 2 figs,” Vegetatio, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 412–417, 1954. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. D. Tilman, Plant Strategies and the Dynamics and Structure of Plant Communities. Princeton, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA, 1988.
  5. R. W. Myster and M. P. Malahy, “Is there a middle way between permanent plots and chronosequences?” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, vol. 38, no. 12, pp. 3133–3138, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. F. Buell, H. F. Buell, J. A. Small, and T. G. Siccama, “Invasion of trees in secondary succession on the New Jersey piedmont,” Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, vol. 98, pp. 67–74, 1971. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. R. W. Myster and S. T. A. Pickett, “The Buell successional study at Hutcheson Memorial Forest center,” Permanent Plotter, vol. 3, pp. 2–3, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  8. R. W. Myster and S. T. A. Pickett, “Dynamics of associations between plants in ten old fields during 31 years of succession,” Journal of Ecology, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 291–302, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. R. W. Myster, “Tree invasion and establishment in old fields at Hutcheson Memorial Forest,” Botanical Review, vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 251–272, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. F. A. Bazzaz, Plants in Changing Environments: Linking Physiological, Population, and Community Ecology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1996.
  11. B. Finegan, “Forest succession,” Nature, vol. 312, no. 5990, pp. 109–114, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. H. J. Oosting, “An ecological analysis of the plant communities of Piedmont, North Carolina,” American Midland Naturalist, vol. 28, pp. 1–126, 1942. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. F. A. Bazzaz, “Succession on abandoned fields in the Shawnee Hills, southern Illinois,” Ecology, vol. 49, no. 5, pp. 924–936, 1968. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. S. T. A. Pickett, “Population patterns through twenty years of old field succession,” Vegetatio, vol. 49, no. 1, pp. 45–59, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. I. Castro, A. Sterling, and E. F. Galiano, “Multi-species pattern analysis of Mediterranean pastures in three stages of ecological succession,” Vegetatio, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 37–42, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. Miles, Vegetation Dynamics, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA, 1979.
  17. A. Borhidi, “Vegetation dynamics of the savannization process on Cuba,” Vegetatio, vol. 77, no. 1–3, pp. 177–183, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. R. W. Myster, “Post-agricultural ecotones in Puerto Rico,” in Ecotones between Forest and Grassland, R. W. Myster, Ed., pp. 111–137, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  19. A. Grainger, “Estimating areas of degraded tropical lands requiring replenishment of forest cover,” International Tree Crops Journal, vol. 5, no. 1-2, pp. 31–61, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. P. M. Fearnside, “Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: the effect of population and land tenure,” Ambio, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 537–545, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. D. Skole and C. Tucker, “Tropical deforestation and habitat fragmentation in the amazon: satellite data from 1978 to 1988,” Science, vol. 260, no. 5116, pp. 1905–1910, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. R. J. Buschbacher, “Tropical deforestation and pasture development,” BioScience, vol. 36, pp. 2–28, 1986. View at Google Scholar
  23. C. Uhl, R. Buschbacher, and E. A. S. Serrao, “Abandoned pastures in eastern Amazonia. I. Patterns of plant succession,” Journal of Ecology, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 663–681, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. J. R. Thomlinson, M. I. Serrano, T. D. M. López, T. M. Aide, and J. K. Zimmerman, “Land-use dynamics in a post-agricultural Puerto Rican landscape (1936–1988),” Biotropica, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 525–536, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. P. Donfack, C. Floret, and R. Pontanier, “Secondary succession in abandoned fields of dry tropical Northern Cameroon,” Journal of Vegetation Science, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 499–508, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. D. N. Fernandes and R. L. Sanford, “Effects of recent land-use practices on soil nutrients and succession under tropical wet forest in Costa Rica,” Conservation Biology, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 915–922, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. P. F. Quintana-Ascencio, M. González-Espinosa, N. Ramírez-Marcial, G. Domínguez-Vázquez, and M. Martínez-Icó, “Soil seed banks and regeneration of tropical rain forest from milpa fields at the Selva Lacandona, Chiapas, Mexico,” Biotropica, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 192–209, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. S. Brown and A. E. Lugo, “Tropical secondary forests,” Journal of Tropical Ecology, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 1–32, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. N. Myers, “Tropical deforestation: the last situation,” BioScience, vol. 41, p. 282, 1991. View at Google Scholar
  30. K. D. Singh, “The 1990 tropical forest resources assessment,” Unasylva, vol. 174, pp. 10–19, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  31. A. E. Lugo, “Comparison of tropical tree plantations with secondary forests of similar age,” Ecological Monographs, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 1–41, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. E. S. A. Serrao and J. M. Toledo, “The search for sustainability in Amazonian pastures,” in Alternatives to Deforestation: Steps Toward Sustainable Use of the Amazon Rain Forest, A. B. Anderson, Ed., pp. 195–214, Columbia University Press, New York, NY, USA, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  33. T. M. Aide and J. Cavelier, “Barriers to lowland tropical forest restoration in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia,” Restoration Ecology, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 219–229, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. C. Padoch and A. P. Vayda, “Patterns of resource use and human settlement in tropical forest,” in Tropical Rain Forest Ecosystems, F. B. Golley, Ed., vol. A, pp. 301–313, Elsevier, New York, NY, USA, 1983. View at Google Scholar
  35. S. E. Hobbie, “Effects of plant species on nutrient cycling,” Trends in Ecology and Evolution, vol. 7, no. 10, pp. 336–339, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. D. J. Mabberley, Tropical Rain Forest Ecology, Chapman and Hall, New York, NY, USA, 1992.
  37. M. Keller, E. Veldkamp, A. M. Weitz, and W. A. Reiners, “Effect of pasture age on soil trace-gas emissions from a deforested area of Costa Rica,” Nature, vol. 365, no. 6443, pp. 244–246, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. R. W. Myster, “Introduction,” in Post-Agricultural Succession in the Neotropics, R. W. Myster, Ed., Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  39. C. Raunkaier, The Life forms of Plants and Statistical Plant Geography, Clarendon Press, Oxford, UK, 1934.
  40. S. T. A. Pickett and P. S. White, The Ecology of Natural Disturbance and Patch Dynamics, Academic Press, Orlando, Fla, USA, 1985.
  41. R. W. Myster and L. R. Walker, “Plant successional pathways on Puerto Rican landslides,” Journal of Tropical Ecology, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 165–173, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. R. W. Myster and F. O. Sarmiento, “Seed inputs to microsite patch recovery on two tropandean landslides in Ecuador,” Restoration Ecology, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 35–43, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. E. M. Everham, R. W. Myster, and E. Vandegenachte, “Effects of light, moisture, temperature, and litter on the regeneration of five tree species in the tropical montane wet forest of Puerto Rico,” American Journal of Botany, vol. 83, no. 8, pp. 1063–1068, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. N. V. L. Brokaw, “The definition of treefall gap and its effect on measures of forest dynamics,” Biotropica, vol. 14, pp. 158–160, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  45. C. Staver, “Why farmers rotate fields in maize-cassava-plantain bush fallow agriculture in the wet Peruvian Amazon,” Human Ecology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 401–426, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. R. W. Myster and S. T. A. Pickett, “Individualistic patterns of annuals and biennials in early successional old fields,” Vegetatio, vol. 78, no. 1-2, pp. 53–60, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. C. Uhl, “Factors controlling succession following slash-and-burn agriculture in Amazonia,” Journal of Ecology, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 377–407, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. P. J. Grubb, “The maintenance of species richness in plant communities: the importance of the regeneration niche,” Biological Review, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 107–145, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  49. R. T. Busing, “Estimation of tree replacement patterns in an Appalachian Picea-Abies forest,” Journal of Vegetation Science, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 685–694, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. R. W. Myster, “Plants replacing plants: the future of community modeling and research,” The Botanical Review, vol. 78, pp. 2–9, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  51. R. W. Myster and B. C. McCarthy, “Effects of herbivory and competition on survival of Carya tomentosa (Juglandaceae) seedlings,” Oikos, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 145–148, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. R. W. Myster and S. T. A. Pickett, “Effects of litter, distance, density and vegetation patch type on postdispersal tree seed predation in old fields,” Oikos, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 381–388, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. R. W. Myster, “Regeneration filters in post-agricultural fields of Puerto Rico and Ecuador,” Plant Ecology, vol. 172, no. 2, pp. 199–209, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. R. W. Myster, “Post-agricultural invasion, establishment, and growth of neotropical trees,” Botanical Review, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 381–402, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. R. W. Myster, “Early successional pattern and process after sugarcane, banana, and pasture cultivation in Ecuador,” The New Zealand Journal of Botany, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 101–110, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. R. H. Whittaker, Communities and Ecosystems, Macmillan, New York, NY, USA, 1975.
  57. J. L. Harper, Population Biology of Plants, Academic Press, London, UK, 1977.
  58. F. O. Sarmiento, “Arrested succession in pastures hinders regeneration of Tropandean forests and shreds mountain landscapes,” Environmental Conservation, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 14–23, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. C. C. Rhoades, G. E. Eckert, and D. C. Coleman, “Effect of pasture trees on soil nitrogen and organic matter: implications for tropical montane forest restoration,” Restoration Ecology, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 262–270, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. C. C. Rhoades and D. C. Coleman, “Nitrogen mineralization and nitrification following land conversion in montane Ecuador,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 31, no. 10, pp. 1347–1354, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. R. A. Zahawi and C. K. Augspurger, “Early plant succession in abandoned pastures in Ecuador,” Biotropica, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 540–552, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. J. Edmisten, “Some autoecological studies of Ormosia krugii,” in A Tropical Rain Forest, H. T. Odum and R. F. Pigeon, Eds., Chapter D-8, National Technical Information Service, Virginia, Va, USA, 1970. View at Google Scholar
  63. R. W. Myster, “Are productivity and richness related consistently after different crops in the Neotropics?” Botany, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 357–362, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. R. W. Myster, “Testing dominance-diversity hypotheses using data from abandoned plantations and pastures in Puerto Rico and Ecuador,” Journal of Tropical Ecology, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 247–250, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. R. W. Myster, “A refined methodology for defining plant communities using postagricultural data from the Neotropics,” The Scientific World Journal, vol. 2012, Article ID 365409, 9 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar