Table of Contents
Economics Research International
Volume 2010, Article ID 376148, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/376148
Research Article

Institutions of Higher Education and the Regional Economy: A Long-Term Spatial Analysis

Department of Economics, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677-1848, USA

Received 28 July 2010; Accepted 10 October 2010

Academic Editor: Björn Lindgren

Copyright © 2010 Hui-chen Wang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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